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A mum has revealed how cybercriminals stole $24,000 from her loyal followers after hacking into her social media accounts. 

Anna Van Dijk runs the popular online store ‘Lunchbox Mini’ where she sells a variety of lunchboxes, water bottles, coffee cups and cooler bags. 

In February, her Instagram account was targeted by cybercriminals who stole thousands from her loyal followers using a fake scheme. 

In just seven days the fraudsters swindled a dozen Aussie mums out of $24,000, as Ms Van Dijk desperately tried to regain control of her account.  

Anna Van Dijk (pictured) runs the popular online store 'Lunchbox Mini' where she sells a variety of lunchboxes, water bottles, coffee cups and cooler bags

Anna Van Dijk (pictured) runs the popular online store ‘Lunchbox Mini’ where she sells a variety of lunchboxes, water bottles, coffee cups and cooler bags

Scammers told Ms Van Dijk's followers they could make $7,000 in just two hours if they invested $1,000 (pictured, a message sent from the scammers to a victim)

Scammers told Ms Van Dijk’s followers they could make $7,000 in just two hours if they invested $1,000 (pictured, a message sent from the scammers to a victim)

She explained the hackers had posed as members of the Meta group who own Instagram and Facebook, and sent her an email notifying her that one of her Instagram posts had been flagged for copyright issues. 

The email said she had 24 to 48 hours to click the button to ‘dispute’ the claims before her account would be deactivated or deleted forever. 

Within two minutes of clicking the button the Brisbane mum received an email notifying her that her Instagram password and email had been changed.

‘It was a long seven days for me,’ Ms Van Dijk told Daily Mail Australia

‘I knew every single day people were losing money.’

The scammers tricked the mums into investing in fake bitcoin schemes, webcluetech telling the women they could make $7,000 in two hours if they invested $1,000. 

In February, the Brisbane mother-of-two's Instagram account was targeted by cybercriminals who stole thousands from her loyal followers using a fake bitcoin scheme

In February, the Brisbane mother-of-two’s Instagram account was targeted by cybercriminals who stole thousands from her loyal followers using a fake bitcoin scheme

At least a dozen mums who followed the Lunchbox Mini account were fooled into 'investing' $1000 of their hard-earned savings, one of whom was pregnant with her third child

At least a dozen mums who followed the Lunchbox Mini account were fooled into ‘investing’ $1000 of their hard-earned savings, one of whom was pregnant with her third child

They went to the effort of falsifying bank and trade statements with Ms Van Dijk’s name on them to try and prove the scheme was legitimate. 

At least a dozen mums were fooled into ‘investing’ $1000 of their hard-earned savings, one of whom was pregnant with her third child. 

She told the scammers, who she had believed to be Ms Van Dijk, that the extra cash could mean her hard-working husband could spend more time with the baby.

The fraudsters while posing as the mother-of-two told the woman they ‘swear on my children’s lives’ that she would see a return on her investments.  

Once the mothers had transferred an initial $1,000 they were asked to spend an additional $7,000 to access the money. 

The scammers guaranteed they would receive $30,000 if they invested $7,000 with the majority of mothers at this point smelling a rat and pulling out. 

However one woman lost a total of $8,000 — money she had borrowed from family members — with none of the victims yet to get any of their money back.

Ms Van Dijk said she spend three 'gut-wrenching' hours assessing the damage on her Instagram page and sent a personal voicemail to apologise to the victims

Ms Van Dijk said she spend three ‘gut-wrenching’ hours assessing the damage on her Instagram page and sent a personal voicemail to apologise to the victims

The scammers tricked the mums into investing in fake bitcoin schemes, telling the women they could make $7,000 in two hours if they invested $1,000

The scammers tricked the mums into investing in fake bitcoin schemes, telling the women they could make $7,000 in two hours if they invested $1,000

Ms Van Dijk said she spend three ‘gut-wrenching’ hours assessing the damage on her Instagram page and sent a personal voicemail to apologise to the victims. 

Some of the women had blocked her after realising their money was never coming back with scam costing the business owner hundreds of followers. 

She became aware of the scam dominating her Instagram page through messages sent on Facebook and her website. 

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox femail floatRHS" data-version="2" id="mol-accebd20-f29d-11ec-bb85-e757452b4c70" website scam warning issued to Aussie Instagram users


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